Email: sale@outstandingfirearms.com

BUY GUNS ONLINE

Blog

1911 Pistols review,

1911 Pistols and a Quick Guide To 2011 And Other Double-Stack

Every 2011 is a widebody/double-stack 1911 pistols , but not every widebody/double-stack 1911 pistols is a 2011it has been review and proven. While the term gets used colloquially to refer to any double-stack 1911, they just aren’t.

The 2011 frame was invented and review by the founders of STI, the company now called Staccato…but it isn’t the only widebody 1911 pistols frame that uses a double-stack magazine.

So, let’s review what a 2011 actually is. We’ll go over what’s so great about them as well as some pitfalls to be aware of. While it’s an amazing handgun, it’s not necessarily for everyone.

The Genesis Of The Double-Stack 1911

The 2011/double-stack 1911 was designed to keep the positive attributes of the 1911 (the trigger, ergonomics, etc.) while enhancing capacity, with the first examples emerging in the early 1990s.

The idea mostly came from IPSC and USPSA shooters who wanted a higher-capacity pistol that wasn’t a DA/SA gun and – at the time – Glocks weren’t considered the most competitive option.

The creation of the double-stack guns also helped usher in the Open and Limited divisions in those sports, which to this day are dominated by widebody/2011 pistols.

While today’s shooter generally prefers 9mm, the early widebody guns were far more common in .38 Super (and sometimes .40 S&W) to make Major Power Factor, giving them a big edge in capacity over shooters with guns in .45 ACP.

A lot of today’s Open class shooters run a .38 Super widebody with a comp for this same reason.

So, that was what got people started.

The 2011/double-stack 1911 was designed to keep the positive attributes of the 1911 pistols (the trigger, ergonomics, etc.) while enhancing capacity, with the first examples emerging in the early 1990s.

The idea mostly came from IPSC and USPSA shooters who wanted a higher-capacity pistol that wasn’t a DA/SA gun and – at the time – Glocks weren’t considered the most competitive option.

The creation of the double-stack guns also helped usher in the Open and Limited divisions in those sports, which to this day are dominated by widebody/2011 pistols.

While today’s shooter generally prefers 9mm, the early widebody guns were far more common in .38 Super (and sometimes .40 S&W) to make Major Power Factor, giving them a big edge in capacity over shooters with guns in .45 ACP.

A lot of today’s Open class shooters run a .38 Super widebody with a comp for this same reason. so, that was what was what got people started.

The First Double-Stack 1911s And The “2011”

The first double-stack 1911s and what we now call a 2011 emerged in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Ultimately, all pistols of this type boil down to two fundamental designs that both do the same thing.

The trick is to design a magazine that tapers from double-stack width at the bottom to single-stack width at the top, and make a frame that can use it. The top end of the gun (the slide, the barrel, the firing components) is the same, but the lower is a little different.

The first to emerge, according to The American Rifleman, was the 14.45 frame design by Para Ordnance, which was reviewed in production by the end of 1989.

Credit: CaspianArms.com

The Para design is a solid frame, with a wider grip housing to accommodate the magazine. A carbon copy was devised shortly thereafter by Caspian. Para Ordnance, later ParaUSA, is long since out of business, but Caspian still makes the double-stack frames.

What we now call a 2011 was the brainchild of pistolsmith Virgil Tripp (ever hear about Tripp Research 1911 magazines? Same guy.) and Sandy Strayer. Along with some help from Chip McCormick (also a big name in 1911 magazines and a world champion shooter) they developed a different frame system.

Initially it was sold through McCormick’s company (CMC Products) but Tripp and Strayer would soon thereafter form Strayer Tripp International – STI – to make the frames and custom guns built on them.

The Tripp/Strayer design essentially chops the grip and trigger guard off the frame.

Share with

Leave a Reply

Start typing and press Enter to search

Shopping Cart

No products in the cart.

error: Content is protected !!